Pure Trance Old school

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Pure Trance Old school

Romanpraetorian
Gig Goer

For anyone that may not know how  old trance sounds shoud take alook of this list if they like to know more.

 

Ill update the list as things move on.

 

First album to be labeled [on latte  stages  of proto trance] or just before Klaus Schulze movement  and  what  "  trance" meant  or was defined latter on electronic music .

 

https://play.spotify.com/album/2fUrnjG4BPBH52aEAv1XyA

 

 

 

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Re: Pure Trance Old school

Romanpraetorian
Gig Goer
Highlighted

Re: Pure Trance Old school

Romanpraetorian
Gig Goer

Third before going into the 80s:

https://play.spotify.com/album/3gwpouV58Wxl0kd5OIT8m7?play=true&utm_source=open.spotify.com&utm_medi...

 

The early beginning of the genere developing, and where trance got the name form  and its meaning:

 

In the 1980s Schulze moved from analog to digital instruments, and his work accordingly became less experimental and more accessible. Although the switch to purely digital recording and instruments is audible in the style of Dig It (1980), it was not until the release of Trancefer (1981) that the shift in style became evident. Trancefer was far more obviously reliant on sequencers than previous recordings, and the resultant effect transformed Schulze's style from gentle melodic journeys to an ever-growing crescendo of music consisting of multi-layered rhythmical passages. This is particularly noteworthy in theTrancefer's first track "A Few Minutes After Trancefer", although the second track "Silent Running" is more reminiscent of Schulze's earlier works.

This newer style can also be found in Schulze's next release Audentity. Both "Cellistica" and "Spielglocken" are composed in a similar, sequencer based, style as Trancefer, but this is certainly not the case of all of Audentity's tracks, indeed "Sebastian in Traum" hints towards the Operatic style to be found in some of Schulze's much later work. The predominance of sequencing can also be found in the follow-up live album Dziękuję Poland Live '83, although it should be noted that many of its tracks are re-workings of those to be found on Audentity. Schulze's next studio-based album Angst (soundtrack to thenamesake 1983 film) moved away from the harshness of sharp, heavily sequenced style of the 3 previous albums and, once again, had the more "organic feel" of earlier recordings.

Another highlight of this era was En=Trance with the dreamy cut "Fm Delight". The album Miditerranean Pads marked the beginning of very complex percussion arrangements that continued into the next two decades.

In 1989, German band Alphaville released their album The Breathtaking Blue, on which Klaus Schulze was both a contributing musician (partially) and the album's producer.

 

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